Monk Bags

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Monk Bag

Monk Bag

The monk bags are made by the Hmong tribe who are located on the outskirts of Chiang Mai. Our Handmade monk bags stitched from 100% pure cotton by the artisans of Northern Thailand. Our monk bags have hand stitched sturdy seams which offer great support for all your necessities from your laptop to your I-pad. Our spacious monk bags are practical for modern day life, with a deep pouch, a nifty front pocket and even a clever phone sleeve on the shoulder strap. 

The shoulder strap is both comfortable and practical, providing easy access to the bags contents. Our monk bag has the same simplicity as the traditional Thai monk bags except we added reinforced cotton lining to increase durability and longevity.

Thai monks are not allowed to have any possessions, but they use their monk bags to carry medicine, water, religious books and other incidentals. Monks are forbidden to be touched by females, so if a woman gives an offering the monk can receive the item by holding out his monk bags pouch and accepting his alms.

Traditionally monk’s bags, along with alms bowls are used in the daily ritual of alms giving. Every morning at the crack of dawn, the monks begin their daily alms rite. Due to the monks devotion to Buddha they are only allowed to have things that are given to them. Their daily alms generally consists of an early morning walk round the city centre, where they receive food, water and other ceremonial details such as incense and candles.

The monk’s daily ritual provides all the goods required for that day at the temple. Alms giving has become a popular tourist attraction in Chiang Mai and even though we are residents here we never get bored of seeing the monks while eating our breakfast at the rice shop.There are a lot of rules for monks around eating. Foods must be offered by hand from a layperson, though monks who have received food can share, or trade, offerings with other monks. Most foods must be consumed by noon the day they are offered, so cannot be saved for a snack or for the next day’s meal, except to return them to a layperson. Filtered fruit juices may be offered and consumed after noon, until dawn the next day.  “Tonics” (sugar/molasses, honey, butter and a couple of other things) may be consumed any time and saved up to seven days after being offered. Medicines can be kept forever.